Tagged: Sociocracy

MJ-12: The Technocratic Thread

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by Paul Collins & Phillip D. Collins ©, Nov. 18th, 2006

B.F. Skinner, Time Magazine Sep. 20, 1971Few who have researched the UFO phenomenon are not familiar with the Majestic 12 documents. This controversial series of documents surfaced in 1984 and have been debated ever since. While a related report’s discovery in the National Archive lends corroborative evidence to the case for the authenticity of the MJ-12 papers, chronological and formatting anomalies within the documents arouse substantial skepticism. However, all debate aside, what is important about the MJ-12 papers is the portrait that they paint for the public mind. The papers present a shadowy group of policy professionals allegedly established by a secret executive order of President Truman on September 24, 1947. The underlying theme of the MJ-12 documents is inherently technocratic. That is, they dignify the concept of a Technocracy. A technocratic society, or Technocracy, can be defined as follows:

Technocracy, in classical political terms, refers to a system of governance in which technically trained experts rule by virtue of their specialized knowledge and position in dominant political and economic institutions. (Fischer 17)

Oxford Professor Carroll Quigley also wrote about a dictatorship of “experts,” suggesting that a cognitive elite “will replace the democratic voter in control of the political system” (Quigley 866). Of just such a democracy of “experts,” H.G. Wells stated:

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The Social Scientific Dictatorship: The Role of the Social Sciences in the Mechanization of Mankind

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by Paul and Phillip Collins ©, March 21st, 2006

The New Theocracy

B.F. Skinner, Time Magazine Sep. 20, 1971In many ways, epistemology is like an economic system. With all the right theoreticians in all the right places, one can arbitrarily bestow epistemological primacy upon those paradigms that are most socially and politically expedient. In such a climate of epistemological suppression, academic and institutional barriers prevent competitors from accessing the ideational marketplace. Meanwhile, a self-proclaimed cognitive elite monopolizes the economy of popular thought. This oligopoly of knowledge, in short, amounts to an epistemological cartel, promoting its anointed ideologues and squelching cognitive dissenters.

Within the traditional theocratic power structures of antiquity, state sanctioned priesthoods constituted epistemological cartels. The Pharisees that engineered the crucifixion of Jesus Christ provide a stellar example. The Mystery cults of Mesopotamia supply another. In both cases, an elite few exercised rigid control over the knowable. In so doing, they maintained the socioeconomic dominance of political oligarchs. Within their authoritarian economy of thought, ideas like “liberty” and “human dignity” were appropriated no currency.

However, it was a state of affairs that would inevitably change. As the ruling elite’s religious institutions began to lose credibility with the masses, it became apparent that the oligarchs would have to adopt a more secular system of control. The result of this transformation was the emergence of what Aldous Huxley called a “scientific dictatorship.” Huxley explains:

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