by Paul & Phillip D. Collins ©, July 24th, 2007

Recently, we were contacted by a reader who wanted to correct what he felt was an error in our article “The Reemerging Swastika.” This reader sent us a document that claimed Youssef Nada was born in 1931 (“Extra Vol. 135, Number 5,” no pagination). If true, this would have made Nada only 14 when he was supposed to have helped the Grand Mufti escape from Germany in 1945. So there is a possibility that Nada does not connect the postwar Nazi International to the radical Islamists. However, we have not entirely abandoned the contention that Nada was a member of Nazi military intelligence just yet. Egyptian intelligence services’ sources have claimed that Nada was working for the Abwehr under Admiral Canaris (Labeviere 140-41). Intelligence sources do not fall into the same category as members of the Tinfoil Hat Club. They deserve a whole lot more credence. So it is still possible that Nada was connected to the Nazi military intelligence.

We certainly do not mind when a reader lends an assist by pointing out an error that slipped through the cracks. However, the whole thrust of the e-mail seemed to be that there is no connection between Nazism and radical Islamists. The evidence of connections between the Nazis and the radical Islamists is voluminous. The marriage between these two beasts came about courtesy of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). In 1952, the CIA supported a coup against the ruler of Egypt, King Farouk. Egyptian army General Mohammed Naguib was chosen by the Agency to head the government and Gamal Abdel Nasser became the country’s shadow dictator. The CIA wanted to maintain a U.S. influence in Egypt’s political affairs and turned to three Nazis to accomplish that goal: Reinhard Gehlen, the Nazis’ primary intelligence-gatherer on the Eastern Front, Otto Skorzeny, Hitler’s infamous commando, and Hjalmar Horace Greeley Schacht, Hitler’s finance minister. Egypt, like other Arab countries, were quick to accept help from the Nazis. According to Gehlen’s memoirs: “We found Arab countries particularly willing to embrace Germans with an ostensibly ‘Nazi’ past.” Skorzeny headed off to Egypt to act as Naguib’s military advisor (Infield 205-06).

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