Tagged: Paul David Collins

Neocon Court Coup and the Politics of Disaster Revisited

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by Paul Collins ©, Sept. 25th, 2005

On September 8th, 2005, my article “Katrina and the Politics of Disaster” was published. The ink was not even dry as the article’s major contentions were vindicated. No, this does not make me or anyone else who saw things in advance prophets. The article’s accuracy can be attributed more to common sense (a scarce commodity these days) than anything else. Playing solitaire will get you better acquainted with yourself, but it will not make you a great poker player. On the other hand, watching Chris Ferguson or Phil Ivey play a few hands will give you an idea of how the game is played. The same principle applies here. Studying the cases of elite criminality and elitist tracts will give you the uncanny ability to predict the future.

Research reveals a certain method employed by bluebloods throughout history to consolidate power. A crisis is created by government action or inaction. This crisis leads to tremendous violence and social upheaval that in turn has the population screaming for a solution. The government then plays the role of savior, presenting an oppressive remedy to the problem. Society gets onto a totalitarian trajectory as the process is repeated over and over again. It worked for the Illuminist-bred Jacobins in France. It worked for the communists in Russia. It worked for Nazis in Germany. Today, it is working for the Neocons and other elitists hidden behind the Bush Administration.

In “Katrina and the Politics of Disaster,” evidence was explored that seemed to suggest that warnings were ignored and assistance was intentionally delayed, causing the Katrina situation to intensify. An atmosphere of lawlessness and anarchy arose, causing people to call for Federal intervention. We now find ourselves in the midst of phase three as the government presents the cure for our ills. Apparently, that cure is a shot of totalitarianism that involves a very long needle. On September 13th, Stewart Powell reported:

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Katrina and the Politics of Disaster

by Paul Collins ©, Sept. 8th, 2005

In the wake of hurricane Katrina, many within the government are ducking for cover as the blame game begins. One individual who has been targeted is Michael Brown, the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The Associated Press reported the following:

The top U.S. disaster official waited hours after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast before he proposed to his boss sending at least 1,000 Homeland Security workers into the region to support rescuers, internal documents show.

Part of the mission, according to the documents obtained by The Associated Press, was to “convey a positive image” about the government’s response for victims.

Acknowledging that such a move would take two days, Michael Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, sought the approval from Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff roughly five hours after Katrina made landfall on Aug. 29.

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Legal Land Theft and the Supreme Court

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Paul David Collins ©, Sept. 2nd, 2005

When a student is introduced to the subject of American political science, the three branches of the national government is one of the first topics explored. The student is taught that the judicial branch’s primary task is to interpret the law. It was for this purpose that the Supreme Court was created. In June of 2005, a Supreme Court ruling in Kelo versus New London, a case concerning the issue of eminent domain, drastically redefined the Court’s role in national politics. CNN’s Parija Bhatnagar reported the following concerning the Supreme Courts ruling:

The Supreme Court may have just delivered an early Christmas gift to the nation’s biggest retailers by its ruling Thursday allowing governments to take private land for business development.

Retailers such as Target, Home Depot and Bed, Bath & Beyond have thus far managed to keep the “eminent domain” issue under the radar — and sidestep a prickly public relations problem — even as these companies continue to expand their footprint into more urban residential areas where prime retail space isn’t always easily found.

Eminent domain is a legal principle that allows the government to take private property for a “public use,” such as a school or roads and bridges, in exchange for just compensation.

Local governments have increasingly expanded the scope of public use to include commercial entities such as shopping malls or independent retail stores. Critics of the process maintain that local governments are too quick to invoke eminent domain on behalf of big retailers because of the potential for tax revenue generation and job creation.

The Supreme Court’s decision Thursday clarified that local governments may seize people’s homes and businesses — even against their will — for private and public economic development. (No pagination)

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The Hidden Face of Terrorism

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by Paul David Collins ©, 2002

The following is an edited extract from The Hidden Face of Terrorism: The Dark Side of Social Engineering, From Antiquity to September 11, by Paul David Collins.

In our modern world, discomforting truths are usually discarded in favour of fictions. One such fiction is the idea that terrorists are disenfranchised dissidents who independently generate the wealth and resources necessary for their heinous acts. Such is the contention of Professor Mark Juergensmeyer. In his article, “Understanding the New Terrorism”, he says that modern terrorism “appears pointless since it does not lead directly to any strategic goal” (p. 158).

Juergensmeyer arrives at this conclusion because he restricts his examination to the visible perpetrators, whose motives may be, in fact, irrational. However, he does not examine the patrons of terrorism. Given the exceptional subtlety and discretion of terrorism’s shadowy sponsors, Professor Juergensmeyer may just be oblivious to their existence. On the other hand, he could simply be parroting his fellow academicians in order to maintain the status quo.

Whatever the case may be, this contention seems to be the overall view held by the orthodoxy of academia. With such a view vigorously promulgated by the arbiters of the dominant national paradigm, few can recognise those shady individuals who stand to profit from terrorist acts.

To understand terrorism, one must discard the view that arbitrarily characterises it as “a resort to violence or a threat of violence on the part of a group seeking to accomplish a purpose against the opposition of constituted authority” (Adler, Mueller & Laufer, p. 309). Such an impotent notion is predicated upon the hopelessly flawed accidentalist perspective of history. It relegates terrorism, which is the product of conscious effort and design, to the realm of circumstantial spontaneity. In other words, a contrived act suddenly becomes an inexplicable social phenomenon.

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Paul Collins — Lawyers, Guns, and Money

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P.I.D. Radio 4/20/08: Paul Collins — Lawyers, Guns, and Money

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