Tagged: Nicholas Hagger

Rejoinder: Speculation is not a Substitute for the Facts

By Will Banyan (Copyright 10 January 2015)

In his response to my article, Nicholas Hagger has sought to shore up the claim made by him and other researchers that David Rockefeller was somehow involved in the ouster of Nikita Khrushchev. In so doing, however, Hagger opts for a number of tactics that only serve to highlight the serious shortcomings of the research methodology utilised in his book The Syndicate; as well as the severe gap between his claims to scholarly objectivity and what he actually delivers. But the primary shortcoming of his defence is what seems to be his argument that the facts are optional and can be disregarded and replaced with speculation if they do not fit with the overall “pattern”.

The “Pattern” Lacks Integrity

Hagger gamely suggests that his book The Syndicate provided “context for activities of the New World Order and focused on the evidence”. His writes that his book “presented (say) a thousand facts like pieces of a jigsaw and fitted them together to convey a picture and a pattern.” This seemingly magnanimous approach apparently involved inviting the reader to pass judgement on whether the “New World Order” was desirable, included caveats acknowledging some of the evidence would not stand up in court, and concluded with a case for the “prosecution and defence”. In short, Hagger seems to be suggesting that The Syndicate embodied scholarly detachment, that it was balanced, and committed to the facts.

(more…)

More

Check Your Pattern

David Rockefeller’s meeting with Nikita Khrushchev, the KGB-influenced removal of Khrushchev and Rockefeller’s meetings with Alexei Kosygin

By Nicholas Hagger (Copyright © 29 December 2014)

Editors note: This is a response to Will Banyan’s earlier article, Check Your Sources, Gentlemen! (Part 2).

It is more than ten years since my book The Syndicate first appeared. It provided a context for the activities of the New World Order and focused on the evidence. More evidence has since come through for David Rockefeller’s meeting with Khrushchev on 29 July 1964, and this meeting can now be seen within the context of Rockefeller’s many meetings with Brezhnev’s Premier Alexei Kosygin after the downfall of Khrushchev in October 1964.

On pp.ix–x of The Syndicate I wrote that a judgment has to be made as to whether the New World Order – the elitist, self-serving attempt at world government as distinct from a democratic World State – works for the good of everyone or for the interests of the few. I wrote: “In covering so much ground in one book I realize it often makes assumptions and judgments that may seem questionable, particularly in the case of recent events. As in any court of law, some of the evidence for the Syndicate and its actions will be less than satisfactory – circumstantial, hearsay and inadmissible. But a judgment has to be made.” On pp.275–7 I set out the case for the prosecution and defence and invited the reader to give a verdict. On pp.325–7 I discussed the varying quality of my sources in a ‘Note to the Reader on the Quality of the Sources’.

In The Syndicate I presented (say) a thousand facts like pieces of a jigsaw and fitted them together to convey a picture and pattern. I added 109 pages of ‘Notes/Sources’.  I invited the reader to decide whether the whole picture and pattern were accurate. I also invited further scrutiny of the evidence so that readers could be certain of the truth.

We are now looking at just one of the thousand jigsaw pieces and are, for the moment, ignoring the larger pattern. David Rockefeller gives an account of his meeting with Khrushchev on 29 July 1964 in his Memoirs, which arrived too late to be included in The Syndicate (although I was able to add it to the Bibliography of the final proof). He includes a “paraphrase” of the notes his daughter Neva took of the meeting. Neva’s notes (pp.226–231) show that the topics discussed were:

(more…)

More