by Phillip D. Collins ©, Feb. 24th, 2005

In part two of this article, we trace the thread of the concept of ‘survival of the fittest’ from Condorcet to Malthus, to Spencer, to Wallace and to Darwin; elucidate the ‘predictive programming’ contained in science fiction novels; and illuminate the extraterrestrial connection, specifically the Freemasonic import of Sirius, the Dog Star.

Science Fiction: A Means of Predictive Programming

Aldous Huxley first presented the ‘scientific dictatorship’ to the public imagination in his book Brave New World. In Dope, Inc., associates of political dissident Lyndon LaRouche claim that Huxley’s book was actually a ‘mass appeal’ organizing document written ‘on behalf of one-world order’ (Dope, Inc., 538). The book also claims the United States is the only place where Huxley’s ‘science fiction classic’ is taught as an allegorical condemnation of fascism. If this is true, then the ‘scientific dictatorship’ presented within the pages of his 1932 novel Brave New World is a thinly disguised roman a’ clef – a novel that thinly veils real people or events – awaiting tangible enactment.

Such is often the case with ‘science fiction’ literature. According to researcher Michael Hoffman, this literary genre is instrumental in the indoctrination of the masses into the doctrines of the elite:

“Traditionally, ‘science fiction’ has appeared to most people as an adolescent genre, the province of time-wasting fantasies. This has been the great strength of this genre as a vehicle for the inculcation of the ideology favored by the Cryptocracy. As J.H. Towsen points out in Clowns, only when people think they are not buying something can the real sales pitch begin. While it is true that with the success of NASA’s Gemini space program and the Apollo moon flights more serious attention and respectability was accorded ‘science fiction,’ nonetheless in its formative seeding time, from the late 19th century through the 1950s, the predictive program known as ‘science fiction’ had the advantage of being derided as the solitary vice of misfit juveniles and marginal adults.” (Hoffman, 205)

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