by Paul and Phillip Collins ©, Feb. 1st, 2005

The actions taken by the Bush Administration in the aftermath of 9-11 have caused muckrakers from across the political spectrum to take a closer look at the hidden hand guiding the current President. Researchers, both left and right, have identified the same enemy: a faction of the elite known as neoconservatives. The exposure has led to mounting opposition against the neoconservative agenda from numerous grassroots activists.

Now, several neoconservatives are launching a counterattack. The strategy is one of vilification. In an article for National Review, Michael Rubin characterized the neocons’ opponents as anti-Semites obsessed with conspiracy theories (Rubin). Max Boot continued with the “conspiracy theory” angle, claiming that the neocons’ opponents have overactive imaginations:

“A cabal of neoconservatives has hijacked the Bush administration’s foreign policy and transformed the world’s sole superpower into a unilateral monster. Say what? In truth, stories about the ‘neocon’ ascendancy-and the group’s insidious intent to wage preemptive wars across the globe-have been much exaggerated. And by telling such tall tales, critics have twisted the neocons’ identities and thinking on U.S. foreign policy into an unrecognizable caricature.” (Boot)

Why have the neocons’ retaliation been so aggressive? Do they simply wish to “set the record straight”? Are Rubin and Boot merely trying to correct several misconceptions over neoconservatism? The tone of their rhetoric and apologetics suggest another motivation: obfuscation. The neocons realize that continued exposure will eventually lead to the destruction of even the most well constructed disguise. One individual who realizes that the neocons have camouflaged their real intentions is Pulitzer Prize winning author Seymour Hersh. Hersh characterized the neocons in the following way: “…one of the things that you could say is, the amazing thing is we are been taken over basically by a cult, eight or nine neo-conservatives have somehow grabbed the government” (Hersh). Cults are usually very adept at the concealment game. Many times the masquerade is so effective that a group’s own members do not even realize they are part of a cult. What lies at the center of the cult of Neoconservatism?

(more…)

More