Tagged: Bavarian Illuminati

May Day and the Posthumous Influence of the Illuminati

by Terry Melanson ©, May 3rd, 2006

“Just how significant is the impact of leftists within the illegal immigration movement? It is no accident that they chose May 1 as their day of demonstration and boycott. It is the worldwide day of commemorative demonstrations by various socialist, communist, and even anarchic organizations.”

“On May 1, the world working class displays its strength in demonstrations and strikes,” explains communist writer Andy McInerney in the Spring 1996 issue of Liberation & Marxism. “May Day — International Workers’ Day — is a reminder to the ruling classes that their days are numbered…. From 1919 onward, the success of May Day in the United States would depend on the success of the communist movement.”

– William F. Jasper, Why May Day?

Beltane Fire Festival; Zoroaster Fire Temple Secret societies do nothing without multiple layers of esoteric meaning; symbolism is of vital importance. It was in this tradition that Adam Weishaupt founded the Illuminati on May 1st, 1776. When we look at the doctrine of the Illuminati, it becomes clear that the choice of May Day for its birth was no coincidence.

Weishaupt was well aware of the pagan celebrations that had been practiced for thousands of years on the first of May—which were maintained in some form up to Weishaupt’s time, and still continue to this day. Beltane, as it is known in the British Isles, marks “the midpoint in the Sun’s progress between the vernal equinox and summer solstice.” The etymology of the word means “bright fire”, “bale-fire” or “Baal’s fire”. The festivals on May 1st literally stem from a form of sun and fire worship.

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Circumpunct

The circumpunct (circled-dot; dot within a circle) was indeed an important symbol for the Illuminati – in particular, it was used in internal correspondences, instead of writing the words “Order of the Illuminati”; similarly, when referring to a lodge a square symbol was used instead.

The symbol has a long history within Freemasonry, hermeticism, rosicrucianism, alchemy and astrology. It’s the alchemical symbol for gold but more anciently has always represented the sun.

For Weishaupt, however, his use of the symbol most certainly derived from the Monad symbol of the Pythagoreans, which was elaborated upon by Gottfried Leibniz in his Monadology of 1714. Weishaupt was greatly influenced by Leibniz and also revered Pythagoras and the ancient schools of wisdom. Look to what it meant to both Pythagoras and Leibniz and you can be sure that it was in this context that the Illuminati had used it.

- Terry Melanson (in response to a comment here)

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An Evaluation of Carroll Quigley’s Thoughts on the Illuminati, Buonarroti and the Carbonari

Featured-Quigley-Illuminati

Kevin Cole recently wrote an informative article about Carroll Quigley: “Professor Carroll Quigley and the Article that Said Too Little: Reclaiming History from Omission and Partisan Straw Men.” It concerns a Washington Post article in 1975 about how Carroll Quigley, Georgetown University professor of history, had unwittingly become a hero of sorts for the conspiracy theories promulgated by the John Birch Society. The interview, conducted by Rudy Maxa, was recorded and is available on the internet with an accompanying transcript (part one, two, three, four and five).

It’s pretty clear that the recording formed the material used by Maxa for the writing of the Post article, however as Kevin Cole has highlighted there are glaring omissions that hadn’t made it into the article.

I’ll let you read Cole’s assessment for yourself. He brings up good points.

What follows are my own observations about particulars in the interview for which I have some insight.

The discussion on the Illuminati and the Carbonari, in parts four and five, are interesting – for what is said, what’s left out, and certain erroneous statements and/or logic.

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Illuminati Conspiracy Part One: A Precise Exegesis on the Available Evidence

Featured-Bavarian-Illuminati

First Published at ConspiracyArchive.com on Aug. 5th, 2005

Weishaupt-owl

A Metaprogrammer at the Door of Chapel Perilous

In the literature that concerns the Illuminati relentless speculation abounds. No other secret society in recent history – with the exception of Freemasonry – has generated as much legend, hysteria, and disinformation. I first became aware of the the Illuminati about 14 years ago. Shortly thereafter I read a book, written by Robert Anton Wilson, called Cosmic Trigger: Final Secret of the Illuminati. Wilson published it in 1977 but his opening remarks on the subject still ring true today:

Briefly, the background of the Bavarian Illuminati puzzle is this. On May 1, 1776, in Bavaria, Dr. Adam Weishaupt, a professor of Canon Law at Ingolstadt University and a former Jesuit, formed a secret society called the Order of the Illuminati within the existing Masonic lodges of Germany. Since Masonry is itself a secret society, the Illuminati was a secret society within a secret society, a mystery inside a mystery, so to say. In 1785 the Illuminati were suppressed by the Bavarian government for allegedly plotting to overthrow all the kings in Europe and the Pope to boot. This much is generally agreed upon by all historians.1 Everything else is a matter of heated, and sometimes fetid, controversy.

It has been claimed that Dr. Weishaupt was an atheist, a Cabalistic magician, a rationalist, a mystic; a democrat, a socialist, an anarchist, a fascist; a Machiavellian amoralist, an alchemist, a totalitarian and an “enthusiastic philanthropist.” (The last was the verdict of Thomas Jefferson, by the way.) The Illuminati have also been credited with managing the French and American revolutions behind the scenes, taking over the world, being the brains behind Communism, continuing underground up to the 1970s, secretly worshipping the Devil, and mopery with intent to gawk. Some claim that Weishaupt didn’t even invent the Illuminati, but only revived it. The Order of Illuminati has been traced back to the Knights Templar, to the Greek and Gnostic initiatory cults, to Egypt, even to Atlantis. The one safe generalization one can make is that Weishaupt’s intent to maintain secrecy has worked; no two students of Illuminology have ever agreed totally about what the “inner secret” or purpose of the Order actually was (or is . . .). There is endless room for spooky speculation, and for pedantic paranoia, once one really gets into the literature of the subject; and there has been a wave of sensational “ex-poses” of the Illuminati every generation since 1776. If you were to believe all this sensational literature, the damned Bavarian conspirators were responsible for everything wrong with the world, including the energy crises and the fact that you can’t even get a plumber on weekends. (pp. 3-4)

That short excerpt is perhaps the most honest and succinct introduction to the Illuminati as you’ll ever come across. So it is more than a bit ironic that Wilson, throughout the rest of the text, proceeds to perpetuate and expand upon similar myths, and in the process manages to take it to a whole new level.2 In the end, the Illuminati had mystified Wilson as much as anyone in the preceding centuries.

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Two (non-Amazon) Reviews of Perfectibilists

Originally Published at Conspiracy Archive on 2010/03/14

Charles Burris at the Lew Rockwell blog:

“The revolutionary movement which began in 1789 in the Cercle Social, which in the middle of its course had as its chief representatives Leclerc and Roux, and which finally with Babeuf’s conspiracy was temporarily defeated, gave rise to the communist idea which Babeuf’s friend Buonarroti re-introduced in France after the Revolution in 1830. This idea, consistently developed, is the idea of the new world order.”

This quote (found here in full context) is from The Holy Family, the first joint collaboration volume of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. It was written several years before their more celebrated (and originally anonymous) 1848 work, The Communist Manifesto.

So from Marx and Engels — the founding fathers of modern communism — we have it boldly stated: the communist idea = the new world order.

OK — David Rockefeller, Henry Kissinger, George H. W. Bush, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, John McCain, Barack Obama, ad nauseam — how do you explain away this one? Conspiracy fact or conspiracy theory?

I found this extremely revealing quote in Perfectibilists: The 18th Century Bavarian Order of the Illuminati by Terry Melanson. I just received this wonderful book a couple of days ago from Amazon.com. In that time I have only begun to scratch the surface of its encyclopedic amassing of factual information concerning its controversial subject, yet it is fast becoming one of my favorite books. I have not been this impressed with a new book for a very long time. The carefully detailed scholarship is evident throughout this handsome, beautifully executed volume.

Melanson’s work deserves to be placed on the same reference shelf as James Billington’s Fire in the Minds of Men, and Carroll Quigley’s Tragedy and Hope, for its scholastic integrity and dedication to truth-telling without tabloid sensation or hyperbole.

While this will be the definitive English-language history of the Bavarian Illuminati, there is so much more to its remarkable contents. Melanson’s intriguing discussion of how Freemasonry, the Rosicrucians, and the Jesuits relate to the Illuminati within the milieu of the Aufklarung (the German Enlightenment) is particularly fascinating and dispels much prior pseudo-scholarship and hot house theorizing by supposed authorities on these topics.

From Marco Di Luchetti’s “Illuminati of Bavaria” site:

Terry Melanson, Perfectibilists (2009).

This is a superb, insightful and intelligent history of the Order of the Illuminati of Bavaria. It is the foundation stone upon which any modern proper understanding of the Illuminati should be based. Mr. Melanson treats his subject objectively and with precise care, never exaggerating but instead providing all the essential details. The thoroughness of his research is self-evident. Because I have read many of the books upon which he relies, I can confirm his accuracy. I read carefully to find even a single error, and found none. Mr. Melanson’s book will therefore for a long time to come fill in the dark gaps in history regarding the Illuminati, and hopefully bring to a close the current chapter where hype and conjecture are taken as a factual account.

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Secret Societies, Freemasonry, Cronyism and Conspiracy: Answers

revolutionnaire

Originally Published at Conspiracy Archive on 2009/05/19

Theirs and mine…

Many so called secret societies figure in conspiracy theories as bodies, secretly ruling the world. But do you think some of these societies accomplished something really significant in reality? Or are they only ordinary groups of people with common interests who maybe sometimes delight in being seen in mysterious way?

The heyday of secret societies occurred during the 18th Century. We see the birth of Freemasonry-proper along with its enumerable offshoots or extensions, as well as the more socio-political variety represented by the Bavarian Illuminati. But, all of them – without exception – as you say – “delight[ed] in being seen in [a] mysterious way.”

The Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Criticism also gave birth to the modern conspiracy theory. And this is due, in large measure, to the very real machinations of the Bavarian Illuminati. When John Robison wrote Proofs of a Conspiracy in 1797; a more apt title there was not. Through defectors from the secret society itself to the confiscation of internal correspondences by the government, it was learned that the Illuminati’s sole raison d’être was infiltration and subversion – a conspiracy through-and-through. One did not need further “theorizing,” for the Illuminati was a concrete manifestation of everyone’s worst fears.

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31st Pharavardin 1377 Y.Z.

Originally Published at Conspiracy Archive on 2009/04/30

communeTomorrow is the 233rd anniversary of the birth of the Order of the Illuminati in 1776. Their calendar was based upon the Zoroastrian religious calendar, commencing from the ascension to the throne of Yazdegerd III (1377 years ago), and is still in use today in Iran. (1377 and 233; posted at 7:44 pm? A synchromystic numerologist may have something to say about that.)

Adam Weishaupt had grand illusions about clothing the higher mysteries of his Order in fire worship. “The Order, in the higher grades, will be called again: the Cult of Fire, the Fire Order, or the Order of the Parsees,” he wrote to his disciple Cato-Zwack on 6 Pharavardin 1779. “The ultimate aim of the Order is for the Light [or Enlightenment] to blaze bright; we fight against the darkness; this is the Cult of Fire,” Weishaupt reiterated (Einige Originalschriften des Illuminatenordens, pp. 330-1).

As I wrote before (and a bit more in Perfectibilists): that May 1st was chosen as the date for instituting the Illuminati is a semiotic stroke genius.

In hindsight, it’s obvious that, for the Illuminati May 1st had significance as the day in which the “cult of fire” was/is celebrated throughout Europe and Britain as Walpurgisnacht and Beltane. I don’t think it is accident that they chose the date. I also don’t think it is accident for May Day to have become a sacred revolutionary holiday for socialists, communists and anarchists. The Illuminati were the forebears of these, and acknowledged as such by the likes of Louis Blanc, Buonarroti and his secret societies (the Sublimes Maîtres Parfaits, Adelphi and Philadelphes), Speshnev and the Petrashevsky circle, and no doubt the Spartacist League as well.

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Re: “Concerning the Count of Saint-Germain”

Originally Published at Conspiracy Archive on 2009/01/21

Design sketch of the alchemical laboratory at the estate of Landgrave Karl von Hessen Kassel

Design sketch of the alchemical laboratory at the estate of Landgrave Karl von Hessen Kassel

In an email Monday, L.G. wrote:

I’ve been searching for materials about the Illuminati (I read yesterday some of your notes on “May Day” and the Illuminati – quite interesting and helpful!) and there is one historical personage that keeps popping up in my searches: Saint Germain, the so-called “Wonderman of Europe”. I don’t know if he was an “illuminatus”, but his persistent connections to May 1st in the New Age Movement are very interesting. According to some sources, he “ascended” on May 1st 1684, and was crowned as the new “Chohan” (Planetary Lord) on May 1st 1954. I know these are just New Age inventions, with no historical value, but anyway the choice of that day is curious, to say the least.

While reading Manly P. Hall’s “The Secret Destiny of America”, I noticed he mentioned a person –not named in the book– who apparently influenced the creation of the american flag and called himself “The Professor”. What I wanted to know is if you know, from your own studies, if this man had anything to do with the well-known european aristocrat who called himself the Count of Saint Germain. If there was a connection, and if there was any possibility for him to have been a member of the Bavarian Illuminati, maybe this could explain the connection between the New Age “Ascended Master” Saint Germain and the day of the foundation of the Bavarian Illuminati.

By the way, as I’m talking about Saint Germain and the New Age Movement, maybe you’ll find curious the fact that certain new age circles working with this “ascended master” use a kind of violet disc with a dot in the middle as a tool for “spiritual exercises”. You can see it here (the fourth from above):
http://www.naveluz.arq.br/download.htm

This, amazingly, reminds me of the point within a circle used by the Illuminati to designate their Order. What do you think about all this?

Thanks for your time and attention.

The short answer, is no; Saint Germain wasn’t a member of the Illuminati. His name doesn’t appear on any authentic membership list, nor would you expect to find it. Quite the opposite.

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