Tagged: A.Q. Khan

Blackmailed by the Bomb: Nuclear Anxiety and the Cult of the Superweapon

by Paul & Phillip D. Collins, October 18, 2009

In May of 2009, respected American journalist Seymour Hersh shared a shocking revelation during an Arab TV interview. According to Hersh, Pakistan’s former prime minister, Benazir Bhutto, was a victim of a “special death squad formed by former U.S. vice-president Dick Cheney” (“U.S. special squad killed Benazir”). This squad was “headed by General Stanley McChrystal, the newly-appointed commander of U.S. army in Afghanistan” with Cheney using his position as chief of the Joint Special Operation Command to “clear the way for the U.S. by exterminating opponents through the unit and the CIA” (ibid).

Hersh has speculated that Bhutto was assassinated because she shared her opinion that Osama Bin Laden had been assassinated by Omar Saeed Sheikh (ibid). Could there be, however, a deeper reason for the Bhutto hit? These writers suggested as much during interviews on several radio shows shortly after the December 27, 2007 assassination. At that time, many in the media were blaming al Qaeda for the hit. The chief source for this claim seems to have been an “obscure Italian Web site” that alleged that its reporter had received a telephone call from Mustafa Abu al-Yazid, al Qaeda’s commander in Afghanistan (Ross). During the call, al-Yazid supposedly stated: “We terminated the most precious American asset which vowed to defeat [the] mujahedeen” (ibid). The Web site further contended that Ayman al Zawahri, al Qaeda’s number two leader, decided it was time to do away with Bhutto back in October 2007 (ibid). While all of this sounded like a smoking gun, the claim was anything but conclusive. According to ABC’s Brian Ross, U.S. intelligence officials said they could not confirm the claim of responsibility for the attack (ibid).

While al Qaeda may very well have been involved in the assassination, it should be understood that al Qaeda is merely part of a larger conspiratorial infrastructure, so it may not be accurate to place the blame solely at the doorstep of a single terrorist organization. Bhutto had vowed to do many things that would invite violent reprisal if she was re-elected prime minister. One promise that probably set off several alarm bells among the world’s wealthy and powerful appeared in a September 26, 2007 report in the Times of India. According to the report, Bhutto promised to allow inspectors from the United Nation’s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to question A.Q. Khan, the metallurgist nuclear black marketer and father of Pakistan’s “Islamic Bomb” (“Bhutto commits to letting IAEA question A.Q. Khan”).



Why the Ghost of A.Q. Khan Still Walks the Earth

by Paul & Phillip D. Collins ©, June 13th, 2007

On February 11, 2004, President George W. Bush told the world that it could sleep easy. According to the President, the nuclear black-market network of Abdul Qadeer Khan had been dismantled and the threat of nuclear proliferation had been brought to and end (Isenberg, no pagination). The Bush administration gave itself a pat on the back and Bush apologists gushed with praise. However, new developments have caused the cheerleaders to go silent. A study released by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) shows that the Khan network is anything but dead and gone. Entitled Nuclear Black Markets: Pakistan, A Q Khan and the Rise of Proliferation Networks, the report states the following:

some of Khan’s associates appear to have escaped law-enforcement attention and could, after a period of lying low, resume their black-market business. Decapitating the nodes of non-hierarchical networks does not necessarily eradicate the enterprise. (No pagination)



Paul & Phillip Collins — The Real Motives for Bhutto’s Death


P.I.D. Radio 12/30/07: Paul & Phillip Collins — The Real Motives for Bhutto’s Death