Domhoff researches conspiracies whether he admits it or not

The owners and managers of large banks and corporations, with a little bit of help from their hired academics, lawyers, and public relations people, dominate everything in this country that is worth dominating — foreign policy through such organizations as the Council on Foreign Relations, Council of the Americas, and Trilateral Commission; economic policy through the likes of the Conference Board, Committee for Economic Development, and Brookings Institution; population policy through such groups as the Population Council, Population Reference Bureau, and Planned Parenthood; environmental policy through Resources for the Future, Conservation Foundation, and American Conservation Association; legal policies through the American Law Institute and committees of the American Bar Association; and educational policy through such entities as the Ford Foundation, three Carnegie foundations, and the Carnegie Council for Policy Studies in Higher Education. Every one of these organizations is financed and directed by the same few thousand men who run the major banks and corporations, and every one of them is pivotal on governmental policy in its area of specialization.

— G. William Domhoff, in response to a review of his book The Bohemian Grove and Other Retreats, New York Review of Books, July 17, 1975

G. William Domhoff studies and identifies conspiracies whether he admits it or not; and despite deceiving, inane assertions that “There are no Conspiracies!

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Bruce Schneier: NSA Surveillance and What To Do About It

Good video from Bruce Schneier. A few choice excerpts follow:

Follow that guy last month. The death of ephemeral conversation. Systems that never forget (9:40) …a public-private-surveillance partnership (9:58) … We have built systems that spy on people in exchange for services. Surveillance is the business model of the internet (10:13)

This is truely the golden age of surveillance. Because everything we do is surveillable (11:37)

Metadata equals surveillance (12:09). Okay, there’s sort of an easy thought experiment: imagine you’d hire a private detective to eavesdrop on somebody. That detective will put a bug in his car, his home, his office; and you’d get a report of the conversations he had. If you ask that same detective to put someone under surveillance you’d get a different report: where he went, who he spoke to, what he read, what he purchased, what he looked at – right, that’s all metadata. Fundamentally metadata equals surveillance data. (12:40)

We have built an insecure internet for everyone. We basically enabled the Panopticon, and all the losses of freedom and liberty and individuality that come with that. (16:47)

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Through a PRISM, Darkly: Everything We Know About NSA Spying

From Stellar Wind to PRISM, Boundless Informant to EvilOlive, the NSA spying programs are shrouded in secrecy and rubber-stamped by secret opinions from a court that meets in a faraday cage. The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Kurt Opsahl explains the known facts about how the programs operate and the laws and regulations the U.S. government asserts allows the NSA to spy on you.

Also, be sure to read and bookmark this indispensable Timeline of NSA Domestic Spying over at EFF as well.

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Domesticating the Anthropomorphic Apes

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by Phillip D. Collins ©, Aug. 31st, 2005

Recently, the London Zoo welcomed a new addition to its collection of animals: man. Sequestered within the zoo’s bear enclosure, eight scantly dressed human beings “monkeyed around for the crowds” (Vinograd, no pagination). Affixed to the entrance to the exhibit was a sign reading: “Warning: Humans in their Natural Environment” (no pagination). Associated Press journalist Cassandra Vinograd describes the rationale underpinning the exhibit:

Tom Mahoney, 26, decided to participate after his friend sent him an e-mail about the contest as a joke. Anything that draws attention to apes, he said, has his support.

“A lot of people think humans are above other animals,” he told The Associated Press. “When they see humans as animals, here, it kind of reminds us that we’re not that special.” Mark Ainsworth, 21, heard about the Human Zoo on the news.

“I’ve lived in this country for nine years and have never come to a zoo,” said Ainsworth. “This exhibit made us come to the zoo. Humans are animals too!” (no pagination)

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Crane Brinton quote on utopianism and the elite

The means [toward utopia] - dictatorship of the proletariat, hidden or open rule of the technocrat, the cultural engineer, the planner, Robert Owen, H. G. Wells, Etienne Cabet, B. F. Skinner - is often, indeed usually, quite definitely the work of an elite.

— Crane Brinton, "Utopia and Democracy," Daedalus, Vol. 94, No. 2, Utopia (Spring, 1965), p. 349

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Perpetual War for Perpetual Evolution Part Two

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by Phillip D. Collins ©, Aug. 29th, 2005

In the previous installment in this series, we established the centrality of war to the elite’s occult doctrine of transformism. This occult doctrine has presented itself under numerous appellations, but its core theme has remained the same: humanity is gradually evolving towards apotheosis. The most recent incarnation of this doctrine is Darwinism, which depicts life as an enormous struggle to survive. On the microcosmic level, this struggle is bodied forth by the competition between species. On a macrocosmic level, this struggle manifests itself as war between nations. In hopes of facilitating the purported evolutionary ascent of man, the power elite has instigated war after war. In this installment, we shall examine how the ruling class manufactured World War I.

Europe’s Descent into War

In a 1982 interview, Reece Committee staff director Norman Dodd discussed startling revelations made during the minutes of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace:

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Darwinism: Then and Now

by Erik G. Magro ©, Aug. 16th, 2005

The Victorian Age in England was a time of dramatic changes, new inventions, the Industrial Revolution, and an introduction to new ideologies, all of which would transform the way significant portions of society lived and thought of life forever. The overwhelming external changes in daily life during this period would match in intensity the nature of changes happening in the internal lives of the public. Charles Darwin, as a naturalist, helped usher in this change after a long voyage to the South Seas where he observed several widely unknown species. In 1859, a year after his return, he presented his observations in a book, The Origin of Species by means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. In it he deduced from their widely diverse natures a common thread that linked all species to a single ancestor; the Theory of Evolution as he called the phenomenon soon became a household word and stirred up massive controversy and debate, still resounding today. The implications of Darwin’s theory created a deep divide in culture, a conflict of natural versus supernatural order. Not only did it offer an alternate account of the genesis of life from the Old Testament, but it also gave a sense of moral freedom from the divine Creator and His judgment; it became a cause unto itself in society among leaders in political and industrial circles, effecting science and academia. Darwinism, as the collection of theories was called, changed the course of man’s history forever.

In the immediate aftermath of unleashing the evolution theory to the public, the common man was faced with a choice of how to look at life and live it. Among those exposed to these choices were some of the most important men in the business community, men who could, with their influence of wealth and power, determine the lifestyles of the middle class population by means of their product prices, work policies, and wages in the factories they owned. A staunch supporter of evolution, Herbert Spencer, developed the social application of Darwinism, which was highly influential on the practices of such powerful moguls. The ideology was known as Social Darwinism and made use of the models Darwin used to describe evolution in nature, namely, survival of the fittest and natural selection. These orders of development were the philosophical basis that publicly justified the methods factory owners were already applying in their businesses to stay competitive. As leaders of industry, they believed they had the right to impose whatever treatment they saw fit for those below them on the social ladder.

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American Anthrax

Media Roots presents American Anthrax, a documentary comprised of news footage that establishes, by history’s own narration, how everything you’ve been told about the Anthrax Attacks is a lie. Conceptualized, edited and produced by Robbie Martin, co-host of Media Roots Radio.

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Revolution of the Mind: The Dreams of Aldous Huxley

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by Erik G. Magro ©, Aug. 16th, 2005

On July 26, 1894 in Surrey, England, Aldous Leonard Huxley was born into a well-established, prominent family with a rich history of distinguished intellectuals on both sides who were highly esteemed among the English aristocracy. His father was Dr. Leonard Huxley, the venerated scientist and writer, and his grandfather, Thomas Henry Huxley, was the famously outspoken biologist who helped develop the theory of evolution alongside Charles Darwin. Huxley’s brother, Sir Julian Huxley, was also a distinguished biologist and eugenics advocate who would go on to charter and become the first Director-General of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); his unique position in the world council helped provide Huxley with priceless insight for many literary works (Martin). At sixteen, Huxley nearly went blind due to an eye illness that altered his path in life from a scientist to a writer. His literary career began at Oxford where he met writers like Lytton Strachey and Bertrand Russell and had a relationship with D. H. Lawrence. He published his first book in 1916, The Burning Wheel; a collection of poems followed by three more poem anthologies (Pradas). In his twenties, Huxley wrote for a series of magazines, namely, Athenaeum, House and Garden, and Vogue, but he would gain notoriety for his novels during this time. In 1921, Crome Yellow, was published followed by two comedies, Antic Hay (1923) and Those Barren Leaves (1925), which would earn him acclaim from critics for the important social issues he raised. Proceeding works include essays examining philosophical and cultural issues and novels reflecting his background influences in science. His personal best-selling novel was Point Counter Point (1928), but his highest literary achievement is the visionary future look at a spiritually bereft society in a one-world technocratic state in his classic novel, Brave New World (1932).

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