Originally Published at Conspiracy Archive on 2011/02/05

I’ve only watched three episodes of Meltzer’s show, online, and each of them was dissatisfying. The latest one on the Georgia Guidestones was especially so.

The Meltzer gang of ostensible noobs, drive up to the monument in a brand new Porsche Cayenne. (Way to go guys, my kind of sponsor!) After giving the stones a quick look, they are approached by Raymond Wiley who proceeds with an accurate but cursory account. Wiley mentions that people have suspected a Malthusian, new world order agenda behind it. I would also have included the words “population control” and eugenics. But guess what? Not a single mention of it again in the whole episode. Instead they focus on the Rosicrucian angle and neglect to actually get to the bottom of the message. Hey, History channel “researchers” – you do know that Mr. “Christian,” in a booklet, actually expounded further on the matter, don’t you? More on that later.

Back on the road, Bud starts talking about trying to find out the identity of R. C. Christian, and whether he was really involved with the Rosicrucians. Scott, however, interrupts with a better line of thought: “Don’t you wonder what’s running through the mind of a person who conceived of that [whole] idea?”

Cut to Brad Meltzer who gives a bit of background on the Rosicrucians, but stops short of informing the audience that this thing called “Rosicrucianism” – its self-perpetuated myths, allegories and traditions (oral, written, initiatic or otherwise) – is ubiquitously venerated throughout all of western esotericism: from Freemasonry to the Golden Dawn, OTO and Martinist sects, to Theosophy, the New Age and New Thought Movements, the so-called “Secret,” Templar pretenders, UFO Space Brother cults, utopian new religions, even the occult Aryan sects of Nazi Germany.

The next guest on the episode was someone I was looking forward to seeing. Van Smith, however, actually ends up looking like a crank. He claims that he was interviewed for several hours. I would bet that Mr. Van Smith amply expounded upon population control, the elite eugenic agenda and how it is identical in content to at least three of the Guidestones’ commandments, not to mention R. C. Christian’s own explanatory “Manifesto.” Yet what they choose to include in his allotted 2-minute spot speaks volumes about their supposed impartiality.

Since Van Smith mentioned that some Rosicrucians have claimed spectacular powers of mind manipulation, the team now have a convenient excuse to get completely off-track from the serious and documentable topic of “population control” and those who have traditionally held such views. So, for the rest of the show the viewer is treated to Bud obsessing about psychic powers, Christine giggling about it, mystic occultist Bette Jo Benner – “an ordained minister of The Church of Illumination, the church of the Rosecrucian Fraternity, and Priestess of Melchizadek” – espousing an alchemical and Gnostic view of Christ, the 2012 canard, cataclysmic earth changes, Edgar Cayce, coronal mass ejections and manipulating machines with your mind. Standard “History” and “Discovery” fare – an all-too obvious agenda in and of itself.

Before Meltzer’s standard wrap-up at the end, the team stands next to the Guidestones while Bud elucidates what they have come to mean for him: “I don’t really care who put these here. Whether or not it was Rosicrucians, the fact that this instalment … got us looking at Rosicrucians, got us looking at their history, what their beliefs were, again, that gets us back to looking at the origins of human thought and human belief. And so, to me, I’m glad they’re here. Because it gets ya talkin.” Fine. Then let’s talk, for real. Shall we, professor?

To begin with, the first guest they talked to has a forthcoming book on the Georgia Guidestones, is well-spoken, and clearly articulates the most pertinent details about the monument in a short video.

He again acknowledges the Malthusian flavour of the guidelines, but adds an additional insight: that the language – a population of 500 million, including the “cancer on the earth” bit – is reminiscent of “what I would define as late-1970s Ted Turner environmentalism. It’s got very much that kind of quality to it … and lots of mentions of nature, nature, nature.”

Precisely.

I wrote a comment at another blog last year that underscored much the same thing:

The edifice, its message and supposed author, bears the signature of a Rosicrucian, new age, elite environmental philanthropic ethos that reached its apogee in the 80s and early 90s – people like Ted Turner and Maurice Strong and the globalists in the Club of Rome and the Aspen Institute. Environmentalism, population control, impeding catastrophe, world government, allusions to esotericism or occult traditions – it is all there in the saga of the guidestones, just as it is with the new age elite-turned-globalist billionaires.

Anyone familiar at all with the tenets of population control, Malthusianism, and misanthropic environmentalism, will pick up on it immediately. And why so many of us aren’t aware of these things is a very serious question, especially when you take into account that these same misanthropic pontificators (backed by the elite, universities, foundations and think tanks) have seriously discussed the possibility of adding sterilants to the water supply in order to cull the human herd. The “History” channel, as is obvious, will not touch it with a ten thousand-foot pole. On purpose. And that’s no conspiracy “theory.”

I’ve looked into this for quite some time, and there’s a lot of material on this site devoted to it. Have a look around for context. Then come back and compare it with the actual views of R.C. Christian.

R.C. Christian’s “Common Sense Renewed”

The mysterious R. C. Christian gave the Elberton Granite Association a book to sell about six years after the Georgia Guidestones were erected. Under the pseudonym “Robert Christian,” the views espoused within “Common Sense Renewed” are quite revealing. Unfortunately I do not have a complete copy of it. However, there’s a partial extract on the web that we can analyse. (Alas, the whole thing should have been scanned and shared on BitTorrent a long time ago.)

Starting with the preface, we get the first major clue about the ideological underpinnings of Mr. “Christian”:

Using common sense as our guide we must unite with the entire human family in establishing a limited world government capable of settling international disputes through a system of law. We must establish as a parallel objective the building of an enduring balance between human activities and the world of nature.

These will be first steps in creating an enduring Age of Reason.

This is classic globalist speak. Adam Weishaupt of the Illuminati used to preach to his initiates in the same manner (replete with “nature this” and “reason that”), though they called it cosmopolitanism back then:

The secret schools of wisdom have the means, and are the repository of Nature and of human rights. It is through them that man will recover from his fall. Princes and nations will disappear from the earth without violence. Mankind will become a family one day, and the world an abode reasonable men. …Reason alone shall be the sole code of man.

This is one of our great mysteries.

– Adam Weishaupt, in Nachtrag von weiteren Originalschriften, welche die Illuminatensekte [Supplement to the Original Writings concerning the Sect of the Illuminati], II, (1787), pp. 80-1 [my translation]

And traditionally, the “new world order” rhetoric of the elite has invariably been accompanied by the longing for some sort of “world government,” and disdain for patriotism and nationalism. It seems to have been coined in the 1860s by the founder of the Bahá’í Faith. According to Bahá’u’lláh, a genuine “New World Order” required the establishment of a World Government, World Parliament, World Code Of Law, World Tribunal, World Police Force, World Language, a permanent single currency, an international uniform tax, and unity of all the world’s religions under the umbrella of the Bahá’í Faith.

Another typical example is the current president of the Council on Foreign Relations:

“The near monopoly of power once enjoyed by sovereign entities is being eroded … states must be prepared to cede some sovereignty to world bodies … Globalization thus implies that sovereignty is not only becoming weaker in reality, but that it needs to become weaker … The goal should be to redefine sovereignty for the era of globalization, to find a balance between a world of fully sovereign states and an international system of either world government or anarchy.”

– Richard Haass, President of the Council on Foreign Relations, Feb. 21st, 2006

In chapter two, Christian again repeats the “world government” mantra, that the “human family” must “welcome a global rule by reason.”

Also in chapter two, his Malthusianism is laid bare; lamenting the difficulties of “building of a rational world society” because of “human population pressures.”

The most pressing world environmental problem is the need to control human numbers. … To control our reproduction is crucial [...] Reproduction is no longer explicitly a personal matter. [...] It is vitally important that each national government have a considered population policy. The need is urgent and should take precedence over other problems, even those relating to national defense. Population control is a global problem.

And so, he gets to the heart of the matter – freedom. Contrary to Mr. “Christian’s” views, reproduction is not just a personal matter. If the right to reproduce is restricted by the State – localized, worldwide or otherwise – personal liberty is completely gone. Convicts in prison, throughout the western world, are even allowed such basic freedom (through conjugal visits). The jailer is certainly less cruel than the systems theory technocrat.

He then continues with a discussion about “controlling human fecundity” (i.e. human fertility), through scientific means, as well as abortion, and whether the latter form of killing should be considered “murder” compared with, say, being drafted into war!

R. C. Christian is hardly alone in this thinking, unfortunately. The elite have funded and commissioned academic studies on population control for nearly a century. When Mr. Christian was having thoughts about inscribing his views in stone for future generations, Kingsley Davis and his ilk were producing such “reasoned judgment” as this:

A regime of complete freedom in reproduction would be anarchy … The tenet of the family-planning approach – “to extend to women and men the freedom and means to determine the number of children. . . .” – is not a prescription for any social control, much less population control. [...] If a new order capable of providing population control under conditions of low mortality is to be forged, it will come in no other way than by social regulation of rights and obligations with respect to childbearing. [...] When people themselves are the problem, the solution is always difficult, because subject and object are one and the same. [...] Freedom has always been denied to murderers, rapists, and armed thieves. If having too many children were considered as great a crime against humanity as murder, rape, and thievery, we would have no qualms about “taking freedom away.” Indeed, it would be defined the other way around: a person having four or more children would be regarded as violating the freedom of those other citizens who must help pay for rearing, educating, and feeding the excess children. The reason why reproductive freedom is still regarded as “a basic human right” regardless of circumstances is of course that it accords with traditional sentiments and established institutions.